Posts Tagged ‘Eno River’

Scouting report: long hikes at the coast, in the Piedmont

Mel writes: “I am the Hiking Merit Badge coordinator for Troop 395 in Raleigh and we are looking to put together our hiking itinerary over the next 12 months.  As you may know, to earn this MB the Boy Scouts have to do five 10+ miles hikes and one 20+ mile hike.” Mel goes on to mention that he has my “100 Classic Hikes in North Carolina,” but that most…

This weekend: Spring from winter

The pending changing of the seasonal guard is evident this weekend. At the coast we have a sweaty 5K that ends with a bracing dip in the brisk Atlantic Ocean; in the Piedmont, the Eno River Association’s weekly Winter Hike Series is drawing to a close; and in the mountains there’s the opportunity to hike in snow — in 50-degree temperatures. Coast Imagine a 5K where a major shock awaits…

This weekend: Run, hike … snowshoe?

There’s a half marathon at the coast and a thoughtful hike in the Piedmont this weekend in North Carolina. And, weather permitting, you can do the unexpected in the high country: go snowshoeing! Coast Saturday’s Ocean Isle Bridge Run for Food half marathon has been a recent topic of conversation in our household. Our oldest is running the race; a cross-country runner during his days at Enloe High School, this…

New trail: Dig it

Fred Dietrich, who oversees construction and maintenance of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail in Durham and Orange counties, reports: “2013 was a good year for the Eno River Section of the MST trail. Thanks to your hard work we were able to keep the trail maintained, and to build the final section and final bridge to complete the trail between Penny’s Bend and West Point on the Eno. “Over the past five…

Fall color: Going, going …

Last weekend’s fall color was pretty spectacular in the Piedmont. And practically over in a flash. I was fortunate enough to spend the day hiking in Greensboro: along the Watershed Lakes, at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, at Hagen Stone Park. Twenty miles of spectacular color under mostly sunny, cool skies. Yet driving home to Cary, I could already see the color retreating from the roadside woods. That’s not to…

This weekend: Paddle, Party for a Cause, Hike the Parkway

You can’t escape the heat and humidity, but you can work with it. Paddling on the Lumber River, for instance. Or playing and partying at the Triangle’s biggest outdoor festival. Or taking a high country hike with a National Park Service ranger. Coast Looking to escape the heat and humidity? Well, good luck in this part of the world this weekend. While we can’t guarantee escape from the weather we…

Long Trails of the Triangle

Sometimes you just need to stretch your legs — really, really stretch your legs. If you live in the Triangle and love a good, long stretch, you are in luck, because for an urban area it has more than its share of long trails. And varied long trails to boot. Some are paved and suitable for wheeled sports from cycling to rollerblading to stroller pushing. Some are a foot friendly,…

Give a little, get a lot

The highlight of my weekend: handing a bottle of water to someone. Close second: taking an hour to clear a two-foot wide, 15-foot-long swath of forest. Slow weekend? Hardly. Not long ago I decided I should become more giving to the various outdoors communities I benefit from. I’ve written three books about hiking trails, so that seemed a good place to start. And last week I got a Facebook message…

Clear a path for National Trails Day this Saturday

Saturday is National Trails Day, a day set aside for us to appreciate the more than 200,000 miles of trail in the U.S. Officially, National Trails Day dates back to 1991, when  the American Hiking Society deemed that one day a year be set aside to honor our trails; the first NTD, however, didn’t occur until June 5, 1993. Over the years, we’ve increasingly embraced the concept of NTD. Last…

New trail descriptions help with exploring the MST

I write a fair amount about the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, and for good reasons: It’s the longest trail in the state. Eventually, the trail will run about 950 miles, from Clingman’s Dome on the Tennessee border east to Jockey’s Ridge on the coast. At present, about 550 miles of the trail are complete (the remaining 400 miles are on temporary routes, primarily secondary roads). If you live in one of the…