Posts Tagged ‘Hiking’

Hydration: A word about your drinking problem

With temperatures throughout the region expected to flirt with the 100 this week, it’s a good time to talk about your drinking problem. As in, you don’t drink enough. And in this heat especially, that’s a problem. Here are some quick FAQs on staying hydrated: How much do I need to drink? The Mayo Clinic says that for everyday survival, men need to consume about three liters (13 cups, three…

Trekking poles: Jennifer Pharr Davis uses them (so should you!)

“I couldn’t go back to the trail without my stick! The constant ups and downs with 30 pounds on my back were very hard on my knees, and without a stick they would be unbearable. My hiking stick had become an extension of my hand — I was lost without it.” That’s 33-year-old Jennifer Pharr Davis of Asheville, who has hiked more than 13,000 miles on six continents, including a…

Four ways to celebrate the Roan Highlands

I ran into an old camping acquaintance Sunday in the Wilson Creek area Sunday and we spent a few minutes updating one another on our travels. Among her recent exploits: a February visit to Roan Mountain. Roan Mountain in February? I thought. Risky business being above 6,000 feet in the dead of winter. A better time, I thought, would be … right now. Massive Roan Mountain straddles the North Carolina/Tennessee…

Hikes from a road trip

Today, a slideshow. At the end of May, I helped my daughter move from North Carolina to Salt Lake City for her first job. Along the way, we managed to work in a hike or four. All were spontaneous, there was no planning. These were pretty much of the, ‘Hey! We’re in the Ozarks! Let’s pull over and hike” variety. Roadside hikes that were pretty dang awesome. We started in…

Trail etiquette: play nice

We head into the wayback machine again to revisit the timely topic of trail etiquette. The following first appeared here on March 19, 2010. It reappears today, with minor revisions.  Sunday, I was running the bike and bridle trail at Umstead when I came upon a sizable obstacle: a phalanx of hikers bearing backpacks spanned the width of the trail, spilling over onto the shoulders. The trail is quiet generous, a…

Good or bad? A lesson in perspective

Grr, another creek crossing, or Yippee! Another creek crossing! Thinking recently about the difference between a good experience and a not-so-good experience, I was reminded of a scouting trip I’d taken in December 2009. Here’s a brief reflection from that trip that originally appeared around the same time. Sometimes, to keep a challenge from becoming an ordeal you have to try and balance the bad with a good. Take my ordeal…

Take the picture, then record the memory

“You could take a picture of all this, but you’d lose the pictures. You look at it with your eyes instead, and it’s in your head forever. There’s not that many people can understand that.” The sentiment was expressed by a hobo named Pete to apprentice hobo/author Ted Conover in Conover’s 1984 book, “Rolling Nowhere.” Pete made the observation as the boxcar livingroom they shared rolled through the northern planes…

Hiking diplomacy

In attempting to explain his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Trump told ABC News last year, “I haven’t spent time with him. I didn’t meet him, I haven’t had dinner with him. I didn’t go hiking with him.” Of the latter, we wonder: If not, why not? Hiking, whether in the Appalachians or Urals, could be the key to achieving detente, to getting past some of the pesky issues…

I miss winter

I miss winter. I realized just how much on Sunday when I found myself in need of a second layer. Light gloves wouldn’t have been bad, either. Or a hat. There’d been snow a ways back, I recalled, and it was cold for a couple days after. But since? I couldn’t recall the last time a hike had started in 30-degree weather. I couldn’t recall the last time I couldn’t…

Hiking: Oh, yeah, it’s healthy, too

News that the company that designs crash-test dummies has bulked up its replicas to better reflect a … growing America — creating a dummy that weighs 273 pounds compared to the previous 167-pounder — immediately made me think, of course, of hiking. If these crash-test dummies had been out hiking instead of parked behind the wheel, they no doubt could retain their svelte, under-35 BMI physiques of just 20 years ago. The…