Category Archives: Camping

Camping: It’s low risk (and you already have the gear!)

If you haven’t seen it yet, there’s a graph from the Texas Medical Association circulating on social media that rates various activities from 1 to 10 based on their COVID-19 risk. Most risky (four are tied at 9): going to a bar, attending a religious service with 500+ worshippers, going to a sports stadium and going to a big music concert. Least risky: opening your mail (1).  read more

A Return to 2015 and the start of a classic Adventure

We visit the Wayback Machine this week to 2015 and the start, for us, of a classic adventure. At the time, we were introducing our series of Classic Escapes, weekend adventures that would take us deeper into the Southern Appalachians for longer, more challenging, and more rewarding hikes. We’ve been refining the Classics concept since, and shortly will unveil a new iteration of classics we call Hike Camp. We’ll share details in mid-March. Until then, we revisit the Classic hike that started it all, at Doughton Park on the Blue Ridge Parkway. read more

Need some ‘me’ time? Go winter camping

At a trip planning meeting for our backpacking trip on the AT this weekend, we were about to wrap up when one last thought occurred.

“Oh, and be prepared for the nights,” I added. “They can be long.”

Really, really long.

This weekend, for instance, sunset is at 5:44 p.m. where we’re headed. However, both nights of our stay we’ll be camped low on the mountain, meaning we’ll lose sunlight a good half hour earlier. Sunrise the next morning is at 7:39 a.m. — again, because we’ll be well below the ridge, let’s make that 8. That’s nearly 15 hours of dark — cold dark. If there’s enough dry wood and we can get a fire going, we can shave 2-3 hours off the front end of that. Still, that’s more than half of a 24-hour day confined to a space not much longer or wider than you are, and that you can barely sit up in. That’s why adding be-prepared-for-the-long-nights as an afterthought is more than a small oversight.  read more

Our 5 favorite group campgrounds in North Carolina

We take a lot of groups on weekend hiking trips to the mountains. As a result, we stay in a lot of group campgrounds. When we book a group campground, we look at a number of factors, including:

  1. Proximity to good hiking. Ideally, we look for a campground with immediate access to trails — and not just any old trails, but trails that will yield a full day of memorable hiking. If we can treat people to an entire day of using just their own feet to get around, we we find they enjoy the day that much more..
  2. Shaded camping. We hike mostly in summer, so we need to pitch tents where they won’t broil during the day. 
  3. A commons area. A big fire pit, a picnic table or two, rocks or logs to sit on — we don’t ask much, but these are biggies.
  4. Basic amenities. We need water at the campsite, we’d like a privy not too far away. A bathhouse, of course, is nice. And if we can park a reasonable distance away — within 50 yards of the campsite, say — all the better.
  5. Privacy. From others in the group, to some degree (hey, we all need a little me time), but mostly from neighboring campers. We escape to the wild for various reasons; it’s those who escape to the wild to be wild that we prefer to avoid.
  6. Good vibe. Most importantly, the site must have a good vibe. It needn’t be immaculately groomed; rather, we like a spot that fits in with the natural surroundings. Sometimes you know the second you drive up, sometimes it takes a night or two of camaraderie to summons the vibe. 

There are other factors, but these are the basics. Based on these basics, here are our our five favorite group campgrounds in North Carolina. read more